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Tag >> sean connery suit
chrismcgowan
This year, the Barbican plays host to a fantastic celebration. Yes, it has been 50 years since the first Bond movie, 'Dr No.' This year, 'Skyfall' is due to hit the big screens and what better way to celebrate than to open up the archives to the public.
You can see designs from fashion heavyweights such as Giorgio Armani, Roberto Cavalli, Tom Ford, Givenchy, Freda Giannini, Prada, Versace, Anthony Sinclair and many more. Of course, here at A Suit That Fits, we love to see the tailored items. We can take or leave the cars and watches, it's the suits that we're keeping our eyes pealed for.
 
There's the Sean Connery look (above) classic styling with notched collar and straight flapped pockets. I would even go as far to say an ever so slightly boxy relaxed shape.
 
Or Pierce Brosnan, bring a tighter sharper look to Bond, with a closer fitting waist and trousers.
 
But may favourite has to be the current Bond, Daniel Craig. With the cool calm and charism of Connery but with a slimmer fitting silohette like Brosnan Daniel Craig is the perfect Bond. A one button dinner suit works perfectly on him, worn with a slim fit trouser he looks the bomb!
 
I suppose the real question is, when your strolling around this amazing exhibition, who is your favourite Bond? And was it the Tux or the overall style of the famous British spy that drew such a following? 50 Years of Bond Styling
 
50 Years of Bond Styling 50 Years of Bond Styling 50 Years of Bond Styling 50 Years of Bond Styling
 
 
GeorgeRayner
Although never meant to be a fashion statement, just a method of hiding their guns in public, the 1930s gangsters did start a fashion craze. Though not until a good 30 to 40 years had passed and the movies and television started to popularise the wild days of the American prohibition and the men on both sides of the law then, Elliott Ness and Al Calpone to name but two.
This photo of Humphrey Bogart, taken at just a few scant years after prohibition had been passed up as a bad idea and you can see what has become the iconic 'Gangster' suit of the 1990-2010. The dark brown wide chalk strip double breasted suit with wide lapels and a long opening and a boxy shorter jacket, the trousers were east fitting with a tendency to have turn-ups (although the one styled above does not). Although the gangster preferred the double breasted suit, the law keepers still stuck to the single breasted with waistcoats ( Elliot Ness played by Kevin Cosnier) or just a casual jacket and contrasting trousers (as worn by Sean Connery's Charter) as seen here in a still from the film 'The Untouchables'.
 
A contemporary photo of Al Calpone and gang member circa 1934 note the waistcoats, double breasted jackets and wide legged Oxford bag style of trousers.
 
And here we have Johnny Depp bringing the whole look up to date in this stylish dark brown two piece, with slanting flapless pockets and slanting breast welt (or pocket).
 
A really modern and stylish take on the 1930s original.
 
 
 
GeorgeRayner
Statesmen and film stars were the main fashion trend-setters in the 1960s, especially during the early years. Internationally known figures had the widest following.
These famous men became synonymous with great tailoring and well-fitting clothes and style. JFK, playboy (as some would say) and youngest President of the USA, was always seen smartly dressed in public, sometimes sporting a well cut, two-piece suit or a sports jacket and slacks, with his breast pocked decorated with just a sliver of colour matching his shirt.
 
Dr. Martin Luther King, on the other hand was far from the glamorous rich playboy, who became , POTUS, but nevertheless as a fiery preacher kept his cloths plain a simple clerical grey , so his words spoke volumes. Narrow lapels and narrow ties were the order of the day.
 
While in the Movie World we saw the first of The Bond films come out, a youthful Sean Connery,as James Bond, fighting the evils that were SMERSH.
 
Seen here in taupe two-piece suit. This fast paced (for its time) story line had Bond dressed in anything from a two-piece dinner suit to a linen Nehru suit.
 
Another new actor to our screens this decade was Micheal Caine, but whereas the Bond films had Connery in all different styles as he headed off all around the world, Micheal Caine's films kept him well and truly rooted in either England or Europe. 1960's style icons 1960's style icons Hence the typical English tailoring you see him wearing below. A classic blue double breasted blazer, no doubt teamed with a pair of light or mid grey flannel trousers. The deeper collared shirt, with the knitted tie were two more additions of the day and the matching sympathetic colours makes this look a classic of sartorial elegance. 1960's style icons 1960's style icons These were the new guard coming on to the worlds stage and getting noticed as Cary Grant and James Stewart started to drift into the background, taking the tailoring of the fifties with them, tailoring like this.
 
The daring bright checks worn here by Cary Grant, that were popular in the fifties, lost their appeal for the first few years of the sixties, but here is a great example of how to wear a distinctive checked suit . By keeping the shirts and ties plain and contrasting the colours, they don't clatter up the elegance of the complete outfit.
 
The pinstripe and then the chalk-stripe like the one above, worn by James Stewart, had been around since the forties - but were a classic by the time the sixties had come along. The stripes on black , grey and blue backgrounds being accepted as business wear in banks and offices alike.
 
 
HarryWhite
London has been the centre of men's tailoring for the last 2 centuries, with only Naples and possibly Rome and Paris coming anywhere close.
Edward VIII can be attributed with making popular the now commonplace practice of trouser turn ups and the Glenplaid (or Prince of Wales check) fabric. Through the 1960's 70's, London was still a mainstay in the world of fashion, albeit with varying lapel widths. Mick Jagger and both Sean Connery and Roger Moore as James Bond were famous in that period for their tailored creations.
 
It's not surprising to learn that many of the world's top fashion designers learnt their craft with some of the finest tailors in London.
 
London is still considered to be a major style capital today, and you only have to spend 5 minutes observing the streets of Mayfair to see the styles of those embracing traditional tailoring and those opting for a more fashion forward approach. Both are equally inspirational when thinking about different looks you can achieve with tailored clothing.
 
 
 
pbeeney
007 Suit #7 (1971 - Connery)
Back to the formula with aplomb, we have Blofeld on baddie duties, comically named female love interests (a diamond smuggler named Tiffany case?!) and supporting duties carried out by Felix Leiter and Miss Moneypenny, lest we forget a cracking signature tune by Dame Shirley Bassey.
 
As in previous outings, James cuts a dashing figure, but this time the spectre of seventies fashion begins to show through in his dress sense.
 
In this version, we have the wide lapels of the day, but the raked pockets on the jacket and the double vent help denote the garment's English heritage. The jacket is made in white wool, without facings, to maintain its versatility and to keep with the decadent seventies look. This is best accessorised with a wide bowtie, to give the ensemble a louche appeal.
 
 
Traditionally, the white dinner jacket is best used as a seasonal item in the summer, or for any black tie function takes place in warm climates or during the day.
 
To set yourself up with a white DJ that would leave even Mr. Bond shaken, click here .
 
 
wlmb2
With one Bond film every year, Sean Connery was fast becoming something of a regular fixture on the world's silver screens, and certainly a darling of the ladies and the box office alike. Men wanted to be him, women wanted to be with him, the quintessential English gentleman constantly flirting with danger and always impossibly brilliantly dressed in a fantastic suit.
Thunderball did not disappoint, performing on all fronts, and providing us with another fantastic wardrobe to examine. As always, there are a number of brilliant suits in this picture, but I'm going to focus on the dark grey 3 piece ensemble that Bond wears in the opening sequence. Even while beating up the bad guy, Bond's suit is immaculate. Although it is still grey, and Bond does wear a lot of great grey suits very well, this suit is something of a departure for Connery. The darker shade works well with his high contrast face (very dark hair and fair skin, a combination which is still classed as high contrast even though unusually tanned for an Englishman!).
 
Although this outfit retains some of the classic tailoring such as the slim lapel in his Goldfinger suit, as detailed in Pete's last article , this Thunderball suit is mainly designed around simplicity. Bond has opted to simplify the line to his suit by cutting out vents, waistcoat lapels, and even the breast pocket. The absence of breast pocket is a little controversial.you won't find that offered willingly in your 1960's England.perhaps he had to buy this suit on the mission in France.but either way, it is a great shame that he cannot wear his signature pocket square to match his shirt. I would always advise getting a breast pocket, not least because we are giving them away in branch this month (while stocks last of course!). Take a look at this James Bond Suit here . I've gone for a heavy flannel, ideal for taking the jetpack for a spin in the autumnal French countryside, and combined it with a deep navy blue lining to compliment his choice of pale blue shirt and dark blue tie. I've also taken the liberty of introducing an individual label, although in James' case, he would surely have deliberately got an individual label under a pseudonim to throw his enemies further off the scent...
 
One thing I haven't put into this bespoke design however, is the breast pocket, or rather lack of breast pocket. If, however, you dare to wear a breast pocket-less style, we'll be happy to take it off your suit...you have only to ask.
 
 
 
wlmb2
With one Bond film every year, Sean Connery was fast becoming something of a regular fixture on the world's silver screens, and certainly a darling of the ladies and the box office alike. Men wanted to be him, women wanted to be with him, the quintessential English gentleman constantly flirting with danger and always impossibly brilliantly dressed in a fantastic suit.
Thunderball did not disappoint, performing on all fronts, and providing us with another fantastic wardrobe to examine. As always, there are a number of brilliant suits in this picture, but I'm going to focus on the dark grey 3 piece ensemble that Bond wears in the opening sequence. Even while beating up the bad guy, Bond's suit is immaculate. Although it is still grey, and Bond does wear a lot of great grey suits very well, this suit is something of a departure for Connery. The darker shade works well with his high contrast face (very dark hair and fair skin, a combination which is still classed as high contrast even though unusually tanned for an Englishman!).
 
Although this outfit retains some of the classic tailoring such as the slim lapel in his Goldfinger suit, as detailed in Pete's last article , this Thunderball suit is mainly designed around simplicity. Bond has opted to simplify the line to his suit by cutting out vents, waistcoat lapels, and even the breast pocket. The absence of breast pocket is a little controversial.you won't find that offered willingly in your 1960's England.perhaps he had to buy this suit on the mission in France.but either way, it is a great shame that he cannot wear his signature pocket square to match his shirt. I would always advise getting a breast pocket, not least because we are giving them away in branch this month (while stocks last of course!). Take a look at this James Bond Suit here . I've gone for a heavy flannel, ideal for taking the jetpack for a spin in the autumnal French countryside, and combined it with a deep navy blue lining to compliment his choice of pale blue shirt and dark blue tie. I've also taken the liberty of introducing an individual label, although in James' case, he would surely have deliberately got an individual label under a pseudonim to throw his enemies further off the scent...
 
One thing I haven't put into this bespoke design however, is the breast pocket, or rather lack of breast pocket. If, however, you dare to wear a breast pocket-less style, we'll be happy to take it off your suit...you have only to ask.
 
 
 
pbeeney
007 Suit #3: Goldfinger (1964 Connery)
The suit I have selected from this Bond classic is worn during Bond's infamous run in with Pussy Galore at Fort Knox . This three-piece is an absolutely classic piece of sixties-era British bespoke tailoring. The selection of a lightweight wool Prince of Wales check fabric would have been perfect for the warmer climate of Kentucky, but the style of the suit is strictly Savile Row. Attributes such as the narrow lapels, a lapelled waistcoat and twin vents are highly characteristic of the tailoring that put London on the fashion map in the sixties.
 
If you'd like to steal some of Bond's dapper style, I have designed the Goldfinger Suit here to help you live out your dream of being Bond. A perfect suit to make a major impression as summer approaches.
 
Image Source
 
 
 
wlmb2
Once again, and for the second time, Sean Connery returned in Ian Flemmings second Bond movie to utter the phrase Bond. James Bond. He is the secret agent all young lads and grown men alike want to be, with his easy debonair elegance and nonchalant penchant for danger, Bond is the man.
007 Suit #2: From Russia with Love (1963 Connery). In his previous post , Pete Beeney highlighted Sean Connerys fantastic suit physique. Connery has everything that a costumier desires, right down to the high contrast complexion ideal for the strikingly dark suiting tones that work best on-screen.
 
What I would like to focus on in this film, is the wardrobe range throughout the film, clearly seen in the clip I have selected here. During the film, Bond has all the staples of a mans wardrobe, The Black suit, The Navy Suit and the Grey Suit. While Simon outlines his plans for a wardrobe to house a great deal of fine suits, every man should probably have at least these 3 suits in his wardrobe...plus another 2, covering every day of the week. I have put together my versions of the Bond suits for you, all in lightweight materials, ready to jet off for a mission in sunnier climes...
 
The Black Suit : A must have for every wardrobe, versatile enough for both formal and business occasions. Looks sharpest when worn with a white shirt and black tie. Beware, however, the matt black twill used here that serves only, in my opinion, to take out all proportion of detail from the suit. Either opt for a textured black suiting fabric, or if you must get a twill go for the most minimal, simplistic design. Connery works the black ensemble really well (and exceptionally in evening wear). In summary, a great suit to carry a gun in.The Navy Suit : The suit that transitions so smoothly from office to evening, one cannot class it as either. For me, the easy-going grace of this suit is a cut above the other examples in Bonds From Russia with Love wardrobe. From the flowing line of the single button, the hallmark of class and sophistication, to the easy notched lapel and white pocket square; this is a great suit. Whether talking to M, getting the girl or playing chess with a grand master from SPECTRE; James Bond looks at ease with himself and his surroundings.The Grey Suit : A great suit for the office, always looks the business. From Russia with Love has Bond in his grey suit when he wants to blend in undercover or simply needs to be taken seriously by the villains. At Off the Cuff, we like to jazz our grey suits up with colourful linings to demonstrate our playful side while conforming to this quintessential office staple. Bond however, does not go in for much colour on his suits, so to get the best of both worlds I recommend a black lining with a grey suit. It is still keeping the monochrome look, but introduces a frisson of excitement with contrast.I love the drape on all the James Bond suits; they are fantastic examples of traditionally elegant and timeless styling. One common theme running through all of the Sean Connery Suits that I would like to note however is a slight fullness, by todays standards, in the waist. Rather than suggesting that it looks in any way out of place; it is simply a different style to todays close-fitting waisted jackets. Fit and personal taste is fundamental in your suit; it is nothing to do with absolute correctness, but rather a fit that is comfortable for you, giving you that feeling of confidence either through cutting edge styling or ease of wear that will give the ultimate suit effect for you.Of course, there is one suit in the film which Bond uses to great effect that we cant really help you with...the Birthday suit.
 
 
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pbeeney
Bond. James Bond. With this phrase, uttered on screen in cinemas in 1962, Britain's best loved secret agent catapulted into our collective consciousness. For over 50 years, secret agent 007 has wooed the women and beat the baddies all while remaining the byword for stylish sophistication.
From Goldfinger to Goldeneye, and Connery to Craig, we will be looking back at all of the suits that made Bond a style icon. 007 Suit #1: Dr No (1962 Connery). The costume designer for Bond's 1962 debut would have been thrilled to see Sean Connery walk through the door on the first day of work. Prior to becoming an actor, he spent his early years as a menswear model, and was no doubt chosen as his build is perfect for draping a suit from. Tall and broad shouldered, Connery is a perfect candidate for a slim line two piece suit.
 
The costume team also worked with his high contrast complexion (light skin tone, dark eyes/hair) to build a non-patterned ensemble that mirrors his features perfectly. Bond's first suit is also a great example of 60's era simplicity. This understated design is truly timeless, and would not look out of place today, almost 60 years later.
 
For my take on the Dr. No suit, click here for the James Bond two piece, and here for the shirt. The tie I'm afraid, is up to you.
 
 
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